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Vandal king

8 Things You Might Not Know About Attila the Hun

8 Things You Might Not Know About Attila the Hun

While the Vandals were consolidating their power in Spain and fighting off the Visigoths, the Roman Empire was suffering its usual problems with court intrigue. The emperor in the west was Valentinian III (r. 425-455 CE), who was only a child, and actual power lay with his mother, Galla Placidia (l. 392-450 CE) and the general Flavius Aetius (l. 391-454 CE). Romans generally favored either Aetius or Galla, and the two were almost constantly at work trying to devise plans to thwart the hopes of the other.

8 Things You Might Not Know About Attila the Hun

8 Things You Might Not Know About Attila the Hun

Gaiseric took hundreds of Roman prisoners captive, many of them high-profile citizens, but treated them well and offered them freedom if they would swear never to take up arms against the Vandals again. Many of them accepted his offer and, among them, was a Roman officer named Marcian who would later become emperor (r. 450-457 CE) and would honor his oath.

Their name is synonymous with destruction, but the group may not deserve such a harsh legacy.

Their name is synonymous with destruction, but the group may not deserve such a harsh legacy.

Over the centuries, their name became so interchangeable with destruction that it became its synonym. But it turns out the Vandals, a Germanic tribe that managed to take over Rome in 455, may not deserve that connotation.

Godegisl Vandalen, der, King of the Vandals

Godegisl Vandalen, der, King of the Vandals

Early Life: Genseric was born in 389 AD. He was an illegitimate son of Godigisel, King of Hasdingi Vandals. Hasdingi Vandals were the southern tribes of Vandals. He was born near Lake Balaton (Hungary). In 406, his father died during Battle of Mainz against Franks. After Godigisel’s death, Genseric’s elder half-brother Gunderic assumed the mantle.

Archaeologists uncover palace of Vandal king

Archaeologists uncover palace of Vandal king

ARCHAEOLOGISTS have found traces of what could once have been the residence of a Vandal king. The stone construction of the tile and mortar remnants indicates that the structure was probably built by the Romans more than 1,600 years ago.

THE BARBARIANS: VISIGOTHS AND VANDALS 5TH TO 8TH CENTURY AD

THE BARBARIANS: VISIGOTHS AND VANDALS 5TH TO 8TH CENTURY AD

Around 418 (or 426), Attaces, the king of the Alans, fell in battle against the Visigoths, who at the time were allies of Rome, in Hispania, and most of the surviving Alans appealed to Gunderic. Gunderic accepted their request and thus became King of the Vandals and Alans.

Slovakian Palace of Vandal king and two tombs of Vandal elite

Slovakian Palace of Vandal king and two tombs of Vandal elite

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Statues of Spanish explorer, king defaced by vandals near Lake Merced

Statues of Spanish explorer, king defaced by vandals near Lake Merced

Bautista de Anza, a Spanish explorer, is credited with establishing an overland route from Mexico to the Pacific Coast of California and establishing a mission at what would become San Francisco, and Carlos III was a Spanish king. Both statues were moved from Justin Herman Plaza to Lake Merced in 2003.